United by our sense of loss

Alan Armitage

Sam Langford

United by our sense of loss

Didcot march

Witney parade

First published in News Herald Series: Photograph of the Author by , Health reporter, also covering Kidlington. Call me on 01865 425271

THEY bowed their heads in silent respect.

The sun glinted off veterans’ medals as thousands gathered to solemnly remember the sacrifice of Britain’s war dead.

Thousands of people lined Oxfordshire’s streets for Remembrance Day services yesterday.

Since last year, repatriations of fallen service personnel have taken place in the county, from RAF Brize Norton to John Radcliffe Hospital. In St Giles, Oxford, city rector Bob Wilkes said: “We are proud of them and their families and grateful to those who gather faithfully every time to show respect.”

Lord Mayor of Oxford Alan Armitage hailed 67 years of peace in Europe and the award this year of the Nobel Peace Prize to the European Union. He said: “The peace prize has been awarded in part to all of us in the UK as proud members of the European Union.

“We work together because we belong together and share so many values.”

Prayers were said from representatives from the Jewish, Muslim, Hindu and Sikh communities and those gathered sang hymns including Abide With Me and The Lord’s My Shepherd.

The Last Post and silence followed a reading of The Exhortation by Oxford Royal British Legion president Donald Sammons, including the line: “They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old.”

Following the laying of wreaths and a helicopter flypast, groups including the Territorial Army and the Army Cadets marched down St Giles to applause.

Among the Second World War veterans was Banbury’s Bert Dowler, 88, who set up the Oxford branch of The Royal Tank Regiment Association.

He said: “It is a great honour. There is much more support now.”

Blackbird Leys’ Keith Templar, 74, who served in the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry from 1957 to 1960, said: “I feel strongly about the Army and the forces. I always look to remember, it is a show of respect.”

Former Royal Navy commander Colin Sharp, 63, of Iffley, said: “It is right and fitting that we should come and pay tribute to those who have lost their lives in service of their country.”

Another flypast was held at the city’s Kassam Stadium ahead of London Welsh’s 4pm clash with Exeter Chiefs. More than 100 RAF Benson personnel were given VIP treatment and members of the base rugby club formed a guard of honour as players made their way on to the pitch.

Other events were held at Abingdon, Bicester, Didcot, Banbury and Wantage, where an inauguration ceremony was held for a new war memorial at SS Peter and Paul church. Historian Julie Summers addressed the service at the Commonwealth War Graves Section of Botley Cemetery, the only cemetery of its kind in the county.

Among those at Wallingford’s ceremony was Dennis Niesigh, 87, who served with the Royal Navy in Burma from 1944 to 1945 and whose father was in the First World War.

He said: “It was a lovely service. It was wonderful to see all those people queueing around Market Square, it was so crowded.”

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11:24pm Mon 12 Nov 12

bettysenior says...

The Unsung Heroes of our Great Country who in Reality Saved our Nation but where we have ‘Never’ really Recognized them or Celebrated them for saving us from the Tyranny of Nazi Domination

In this period of remembrance for all those who lost their lives and fought in two world wars we have to thank all those inventors who made possible victory in Europe. So much is said and rightly so, about the courage and sheer suffering that our boys (and girls) endured so that we won the two world wars but where the boys and women who behind the scenes made it possible are hardly ever mentioned by the media – the vital unsung heroes and without them we would now be under Nazi domination. In this respect if radar had not been invented we would not have won the war of the skies in 1940, as we would not have then had the advantage of surprise (and historians state that Germany would have taken over Britain). It was down to Robert Watson-Watt, the son of a carpenter and cabinet together with people like Arthur C. Clarke. If Barnes Wallis (the son of a GP) and inventor of the bouncing bomb, tall boy that sunk the Tirpitz and the larger earthquake bomb that destroyed underground Nazi communication systems prior to D-Day, the Normandy Landings may have very well been thwarted. If John Argyris, the unsung hero who made military aircraft far safer and fixed up to 85% of all structural faults in some of our military plane before D-Day, would we have won the air war over Europe allowing the allies to roam wherever they wished. Indeed without air-cover the war in Europe may very well have been lost. Argryis’s work has been hidden for years and where his work could have literally saved 100s of thousands of allied lives. Little know also is that Argryis’s uncle was Einstein’s mentor and in this respect he said of his mentor, “My mentor (Constantin Carathéodory was an unrivalled Greek, to whom I, as well as mathematics, physics and the wisdom of our century owe everything.” Indeed, On December 19, 2005, Israeli officials along with Israel’s ambassador to Athens, Ram Aviram, presented the Greek foreign ministry with copies of 10 letters between Albert Einstein and Constantin Carathéodory that suggest that the work of Carathéodory helped shape some of Albert Einstein’s theories. If it had not been for people like Alan Turing (a civil servant’s son and an average performing pupil at School) and his work at Bletchley Park, WW2 would have gone on for at least a further 3-years with the loss of hundreds of thousands of additional lives. These to name but only a few of our unsung heroes and where there is a multitude of inventors that without them we would certainly have lost the war in my humble opinion. It is therefore about time that this nation recognized all this and had an official day to celebrate our great inventors, engineer and scientists. For without them, we would be have gained little and most probably even been enslaved by what can only be described as an evil power, according to what we now know from history. They are therefore in reality the great protectors of our nation but where we always forget them and never thank them for saving us.

Dr David Hill
Chief Executive
World Innovation Foundation
Huddersfield, United Kingdom – Bern, Switzerland – Arlington, United States of America
The Unsung Heroes of our Great Country who in Reality Saved our Nation but where we have ‘Never’ really Recognized them or Celebrated them for saving us from the Tyranny of Nazi Domination In this period of remembrance for all those who lost their lives and fought in two world wars we have to thank all those inventors who made possible victory in Europe. So much is said and rightly so, about the courage and sheer suffering that our boys (and girls) endured so that we won the two world wars but where the boys and women who behind the scenes made it possible are hardly ever mentioned by the media – the vital unsung heroes and without them we would now be under Nazi domination. In this respect if radar had not been invented we would not have won the war of the skies in 1940, as we would not have then had the advantage of surprise (and historians state that Germany would have taken over Britain). It was down to Robert Watson-Watt, the son of a carpenter and cabinet together with people like Arthur C. Clarke. If Barnes Wallis (the son of a GP) and inventor of the bouncing bomb, tall boy that sunk the Tirpitz and the larger earthquake bomb that destroyed underground Nazi communication systems prior to D-Day, the Normandy Landings may have very well been thwarted. If John Argyris, the unsung hero who made military aircraft far safer and fixed up to 85% of all structural faults in some of our military plane before D-Day, would we have won the air war over Europe allowing the allies to roam wherever they wished. Indeed without air-cover the war in Europe may very well have been lost. Argryis’s work has been hidden for years and where his work could have literally saved 100s of thousands of allied lives. Little know also is that Argryis’s uncle was Einstein’s mentor and in this respect he said of his mentor, “My mentor (Constantin Carathéodory [Karatheodoris] was an unrivalled Greek, to whom I, as well as mathematics, physics and the wisdom of our century owe everything.” Indeed, On December 19, 2005, Israeli officials along with Israel’s ambassador to Athens, Ram Aviram, presented the Greek foreign ministry with copies of 10 letters between Albert Einstein and Constantin Carathéodory [Karatheodoris] that suggest that the work of Carathéodory helped shape some of Albert Einstein’s theories. If it had not been for people like Alan Turing (a civil servant’s son and an average performing pupil at School) and his work at Bletchley Park, WW2 would have gone on for at least a further 3-years with the loss of hundreds of thousands of additional lives. These to name but only a few of our unsung heroes and where there is a multitude of inventors that without them we would certainly have lost the war in my humble opinion. It is therefore about time that this nation recognized all this and had an official day to celebrate our great inventors, engineer and scientists. For without them, we would be have gained little and most probably even been enslaved by what can only be described as an evil power, according to what we now know from history. They are therefore in reality the great protectors of our nation but where we always forget them and never thank them for saving us. Dr David Hill Chief Executive World Innovation Foundation Huddersfield, United Kingdom – Bern, Switzerland – Arlington, United States of America bettysenior
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