Scouts museum seeks new home after demolition of its premises

Herald Series: Peter Slatter Peter Slatter

OXFORDSHIRE Museum of Scouting has yet to find a new home, more than a year after it was announced that it would be demolished.

The Youlbury, Boars Hill scout camp museum was pulled down in September for Scout accommodation blocks.

Oxfordshire Scouting, which runs scouting locally, said it was hoping a new home could be found at Youlbury, where the museum was run since 1994.

But exhibits moved into storage, and Peter Slatter who ran the museum, doesn’t know what the future holds.

Volunteers were told in 2012 that the building was to be demolished to make way for new accommodation.

Youlbury, believed to be the oldest scout camp in the world, is owned and run by the national Scout Association.

Mr Slatter said: “We were told if they can find the money and get permission they can create a museum on another part of the site.” But he added: “I’m not optimistic about that.”

On December 5, the Scout Association applied for planning permission to build a new accommodation block on the former museum site.

Vale of White Horse District Council is expected to make a decision on that in February.

Oxfordshire Scouting deputy county commissioner Pat Farr said: “At the moment there is no movement because we haven’t found anywhere but we are looking to house it at Youlbury or it might be somewhere else.

“I definitely feel the Scout Association are trying to help, but because we are volunteers things work slowly.

“I am positive about the situation.”

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5:14pm Thu 2 Jan 14

Nuance says...

How about having the museum at Hinton Waldrist? The first prototype Cub Scout Group was formed there in about 1912 and Lord Baden-Powell, founder of the Scouting movement was a frequent visitor. The barn was the place where Ralph Reader put on the first of the Gang Shows.
How about having the museum at Hinton Waldrist? The first prototype Cub Scout Group was formed there in about 1912 and Lord Baden-Powell, founder of the Scouting movement was a frequent visitor. The barn was the place where Ralph Reader put on the first of the Gang Shows. Nuance

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