Proposals for solar farm studied by neighbours

Wantage Mayor Fiona Roper does not like the idea

Wantage Mayor Fiona Roper does not like the idea

First published in News

RESIDENTS last night had the chance to see plans for the second largest solar farm in the county. As reported by the Oxford Mail in December, European energy firm Aton wants to build the 145-acre facility on farm land in Grove, near Wantage.

And last night, the company held a public consultation of its plan at St John’s Church in Grove.

The Campaign to Protect Rural England (CPRE) previously said the Grove farm would turn fields into an "industrial unit".

 

It is concerned at the impact on the nearby countryside. And Wantage mayor Fiona Roper has said: “It sounds like a bit of an eyesore. I don’t like the idea, if it was very prominent.

“It wouldn’t add anything to the surroundings.”

The solar panels would last for 25 years, and then be dismantled and the site restored to its agricultural use.

Aton is planning to put in a formal planning application following the consultation for the site, which would generate enough electricity to power 6,000 homes. The owner of the land in Grove, Elms Farm, declined to comment until a planning application has been submitted.

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Comments (3)

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3:55pm Wed 22 Jan 14

EMBOX2 says...

A good proposal. Solar farms have panels on poles (this is what should be being installed) - meaning sheep etc can still graze the land if required.

This isn't Didcot Power Station we're talking about folks - it can be dismantled in a matter of days, and won't be a blot on the landscape.

Say yes to this proposal.
A good proposal. Solar farms have panels on poles (this is what should be being installed) - meaning sheep etc can still graze the land if required. This isn't Didcot Power Station we're talking about folks - it can be dismantled in a matter of days, and won't be a blot on the landscape. Say yes to this proposal. EMBOX2
  • Score: -108

1:10pm Thu 23 Jan 14

Adrian1 says...

Holidaying in Cornwall one looks at the patchwork of fields, (not forests) no longer just the green pastures and beige seed crops but many yellow oil seed, blue flax, some fields with great enough poppy infestation they're red, and then those blue silvery ones, close up, a solar farm, with sheep indeed grazing underneath. If we want a natural landscape plant oaks everywhere and come back in 200 years, that's natural.
Holidaying in Cornwall one looks at the patchwork of fields, (not forests) no longer just the green pastures and beige seed crops but many yellow oil seed, blue flax, some fields with great enough poppy infestation they're red, and then those blue silvery ones, close up, a solar farm, with sheep indeed grazing underneath. If we want a natural landscape plant oaks everywhere and come back in 200 years, that's natural. Adrian1
  • Score: -57

1:31pm Thu 23 Jan 14

Andrew:Oxford says...

Absolutely. And let's get more of these solar farms built - if they are on tall enough poles there is nothing to stop them being built on floodplains either - a fantastic use of land.

Personally, if I had any degree of control at OCC or OCC - I would have a solar farm at the P&Rs...
Absolutely. And let's get more of these solar farms built - if they are on tall enough poles there is nothing to stop them being built on floodplains either - a fantastic use of land. Personally, if I had any degree of control at OCC or OCC - I would have a solar farm at the P&Rs... Andrew:Oxford
  • Score: 0

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