COMMENT: It’s even more important that we remember D-Day heroes

Herald Series: . .

THIS could be the last time veterans make the journey to Normandy to commemorate the D-Day landings.

The Normandy Veterans Association will soon disband and many who stormed the beaches are pushing 90.

It makes the 70th anniversary all the more poignant.

We must never forget the sacrifice made by so many to ensure our freedom.

Men and boys took that trip across the Channel, knowing heavy gunfire and possible death awaited.

But they were willing to face that head-on for King and country.

It was their actions, endeavours and lives that ultimately marked the beginning of the end of the war.

And it was the Ox and Bucks Light Infantry that ensured the landings were successful.

The daring raid on Pegasus Bridge and Ranville Bridge led by Major John Howard was vital to keeping German reinforcements from arriving at the beaches, which would soon be echoing to the sound of gunfire and reverberating with the impact of shells as thousands of men set foot on Normandy sand.

Had the mission been a failure, the Allied troops would have met further resistance and possibly been driven back into the cold waters.

But Operation Deadstick secured those bridges, at just after midnight on June 6, 1944, and the rest is history.

Our commemoration of these brave acts should not be consigned to the annals of the past as well.

The tales of heroism, loss and wartime life experienced by those involved in D-Day, such as Marston resident Stan Rhymes, should remind us of our debt of gratitude to them.

The younger generation should read the deeds relived in the pages of our D-Day supplement and appreciate the freedom they may take for granted.

Communities should unite to mark the occasion.

Photos of ceremonies in Normandy, in Portsmouth and those such as the wreath laying at Major John Howard’s grave today in Clifton Hampden should be the ones shared on social media.

So when the 100th anniversary and beyond arrives, we will still remember.

Comments (1)

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9:26pm Fri 6 Jun 14

bettysenior says...

The bravery of those who went to liberate Europe on D-Day cannot be exceeded. For they knew that they may not live that day out and where thousands did not.




But what gets me is how the Establishment, who are never in the 'front' line of any conflict, not even D-Day to lead by example, get on their high horses and try to give
everyone the impression at celebrations that they know the suffering that the lower and middle classes endured and went through. Nothing could be further away from the truth and where one has only to look at how they treat Alan Turing, a prosecuted homosexual, who some say we could not have won the war without him. Indeed some have said that Turing's work probably saved at least 3 million lives.

But when it came to saving his life and allowing him to have a job after the war, the
Establishment did absolutely nothing. Indeed they made his life a misery and where through the laws that they had enacted, Turing could not get another job and where he was before his conviction going to take up an academic appointment in the USA. They even took this away from him so he could not work. Being chemical castrated in the process and having no future, as all had been taken from him, it was the Establishment that ultimately caused Turing to take his own life through suicide. That is how the Establishment in reality acts and where their fronting of anything to do with D-Day is a disgrace and where they are basically hypocrites.

To read more about Turing's terrible treatment by the Establishment who are presently espousing the virtue of our war heroes (never a greater one than Turing in numbers of lives saved) visit - The ‘Establishment’ Makes Amends but where the ‘Establishment’ does not change its spots when it comes to its own -
http://worldinnovati
onfoundation.blogspo
t.co.uk/2013/12/the-
establishment-makes-
amends-but_720.html
The bravery of those who went to liberate Europe on D-Day cannot be exceeded. For they knew that they may not live that day out and where thousands did not. But what gets me is how the Establishment, who are never in the 'front' line of any conflict, not even D-Day to lead by example, get on their high horses and try to give everyone the impression at celebrations that they know the suffering that the lower and middle classes endured and went through. Nothing could be further away from the truth and where one has only to look at how they treat Alan Turing, a prosecuted homosexual, who some say we could not have won the war without him. Indeed some have said that Turing's work probably saved at least 3 million lives. But when it came to saving his life and allowing him to have a job after the war, the Establishment did absolutely nothing. Indeed they made his life a misery and where through the laws that they had enacted, Turing could not get another job and where he was before his conviction going to take up an academic appointment in the USA. They even took this away from him so he could not work. Being chemical castrated in the process and having no future, as all had been taken from him, it was the Establishment that ultimately caused Turing to take his own life through suicide. That is how the Establishment in reality acts and where their fronting of anything to do with D-Day is a disgrace and where they are basically hypocrites. To read more about Turing's terrible treatment by the Establishment who are presently espousing the virtue of our war heroes (never a greater one than Turing in numbers of lives saved) visit - The ‘Establishment’ Makes Amends but where the ‘Establishment’ does not change its spots when it comes to its own - http://worldinnovati onfoundation.blogspo t.co.uk/2013/12/the- establishment-makes- amends-but_720.html bettysenior
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