'Sad day' as increase in rent sees market forced to close

Herald Series: 'Sad day' as increase in rent sees market forced to close 'Sad day' as increase in rent sees market forced to close

A WEEKLY country market has been forced to shut after 65 years because it cannot afford to pay its £45 rent.

Abingdon Country Market, which runs at the town’s Guildhall each Friday, said it cannot compete with out-of-town supermarkets and the rise in online shopping.

Four years ago, the market had 100 customers every Friday morning, queueing to buy fresh eggs, vegetables and home-made cakes.

Now, the committee that runs the market said it was lucky if it sold seven boxes of eggs a week, and the co-operative was making just £39 a week.

Since Abingdon Town Council put the group’s rent up from £30 to £45 in January, it has been making a loss.

The last market will be held tomorrow from 9.30am to 11am.

Manager Valerie Drakley said: “It is a very sad day and our customers can’t believe it.

“People are either shopping out of town at big complexes or doing it online.”

But, she said, the biggest change which had “crippled” the market was the increase in rent.

When she joined with the market 10 years ago, after retiring from running a Singer sewing machine shop in Stert Street, it was as successful as it had ever been, she said.

Her husband Malvin, spokesman for the market committee of six, said: “Our customers are mostly very mature people.

“I think most of them have passed away, and by-and-large we haven’t had any younger people coming in.

“I think a lot of young people don’t know how to cook, and they are missing out on a lot.

“We have got local honey, and that’s good for your hayfever.

“Our food has no preservatives in – if you buy our jam it’s just fruit and sugar.

“I think we’re cheaper as well; the cakes in Waitrose are a lot more expensive.”

In 2005 he said the market was making four-figure sums on its freshly-baked cakes alone.

He added: “It is very, very sad how it has gone down.”

Town council leader Sandy Lovatt said: “It is a great shame, I think they have struggled to get people into the Guildhall, probably not enough people knew it was there.”

The Guildhall costs the council £150,000 of its £1.3m annual budget, and Mr Lovatt said the council was already trying to “make ends meet” there.

The country market will continue to run a stall at Abingdon Farmers’ Market in the Market Place on the third Friday of each month and will still be available for special events, orders and hamper deliveries.

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Comments (25)

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10:16am Thu 10 Jul 14

EMBOX2 says...

Very sad but I knew nothing about this market?! Perhaps some better marketing would have helped!
Very sad but I knew nothing about this market?! Perhaps some better marketing would have helped! EMBOX2
  • Score: 19

10:21am Thu 10 Jul 14

carli says...

Very sad, but surely the people running the market could put their hands in their pockets and pay the £45.
Very sad, but surely the people running the market could put their hands in their pockets and pay the £45. carli
  • Score: -15

10:33am Thu 10 Jul 14

Andrew:Oxford says...

Four years ago there were a few more people out of work in Oxfordshire and people had a bit more time on their hands.

This has changed considerably. More people are working again, grandparents are once again childminding and almost every major grocer now runs a home-delivery service.

Maybe a Sunday Market would be better?
Four years ago there were a few more people out of work in Oxfordshire and people had a bit more time on their hands. This has changed considerably. More people are working again, grandparents are once again childminding and almost every major grocer now runs a home-delivery service. Maybe a Sunday Market would be better? Andrew:Oxford
  • Score: 5

12:25pm Thu 10 Jul 14

King Joke says...

'I think a lot of young people don’t know how to cook, and they are missing out on a lot. '

What patronising horsesh|t. Maybe the 'young people' are at work and unable to attend a daytime, weekday market which at any rate is only open for 90 minutes a week?! What if you want to cook something on a Thursday? Your options are wait for the market and go without, or go to a normal shop. It also helps to accept card transactions, which many markets do not.
'I think a lot of young people don’t know how to cook, and they are missing out on a lot. ' What patronising horsesh|t. Maybe the 'young people' are at work and unable to attend a daytime, weekday market which at any rate is only open for 90 minutes a week?! What if you want to cook something on a Thursday? Your options are wait for the market and go without, or go to a normal shop. It also helps to accept card transactions, which many markets do not. King Joke
  • Score: 8

12:27pm Thu 10 Jul 14

CtrlAltTab says...

Maybe the fact that the Council still refuse to notice the decline in trade in Abingdon due to their changes to Abingdon parking, traffic schemes and of course the fact that most people buy from supermarkets now?

Abingdon lost its tradition ages ago when they tried to update the roads and traffic scheme around the town. I for one used to remember it full of people throughout the day 6 days a week, but the last time I walked through the town on a Monday it was nearly empty.

Council's fault, shame they didn't see it!
Maybe the fact that the Council still refuse to notice the decline in trade in Abingdon due to their changes to Abingdon parking, traffic schemes and of course the fact that most people buy from supermarkets now? Abingdon lost its tradition ages ago when they tried to update the roads and traffic scheme around the town. I for one used to remember it full of people throughout the day 6 days a week, but the last time I walked through the town on a Monday it was nearly empty. Council's fault, shame they didn't see it! CtrlAltTab
  • Score: 3

12:29pm Thu 10 Jul 14

abouttimeto says...

How about modernising your thinking most young people I know go out to work Mon to Fri.
Why not open up on a Saturday?
How about modernising your thinking most young people I know go out to work Mon to Fri. Why not open up on a Saturday? abouttimeto
  • Score: 15

1:11pm Thu 10 Jul 14

Andrew:Oxford says...

abouttimeto wrote:
How about modernising your thinking most young people I know go out to work Mon to Fri.
Why not open up on a Saturday?
It's a very old fashioned mindset... Personally, I'd speak to the management or large employers at the major business parks in the area.

There are 5500 people working at the Oxford Business Park - I'm reasonably confident that if a weekly stall were permitted they'd sell a few cakes. Likewise with the Science Park...

Or even at BMW gates at shift change - catch the staff with fresh cake before they reach Tesco or Lidl.
[quote][p][bold]abouttimeto[/bold] wrote: How about modernising your thinking most young people I know go out to work Mon to Fri. Why not open up on a Saturday?[/p][/quote]It's a very old fashioned mindset... Personally, I'd speak to the management or large employers at the major business parks in the area. There are 5500 people working at the Oxford Business Park - I'm reasonably confident that if a weekly stall were permitted they'd sell a few cakes. Likewise with the Science Park... Or even at BMW gates at shift change - catch the staff with fresh cake before they reach Tesco or Lidl. Andrew:Oxford
  • Score: 0

1:18pm Thu 10 Jul 14

King Joke says...

You've got a cat in b|oody hell's chance of getting an event like this on Oxford Business Park. The landlord Goodman are fanatical about the place looking clean and tidy. Woe betide you if you park your car on an estate road or chain your bike to a lamp-post. They refused to entertain a bus service onto the Park, and resisted attempts by the County Council to put real-time information boards up, relating to the nearby Barns Rd bus stops.

Anything as untidy as market stalls would be right out. It's a pity as it's a good idea.
You've got a cat in b|oody hell's chance of getting an event like this on Oxford Business Park. The landlord Goodman are fanatical about the place looking clean and tidy. Woe betide you if you park your car on an estate road or chain your bike to a lamp-post. They refused to entertain a bus service onto the Park, and resisted attempts by the County Council to put real-time information boards up, relating to the nearby Barns Rd bus stops. Anything as untidy as market stalls would be right out. It's a pity as it's a good idea. King Joke
  • Score: 4

2:05pm Thu 10 Jul 14

piper2011 says...

EMBOX2 wrote:
Very sad but I knew nothing about this market?! Perhaps some better marketing would have helped!
I didnt know about this market either and i have lived in the area for 2 decades. They are not advertising, what a shame.
[quote][p][bold]EMBOX2[/bold] wrote: Very sad but I knew nothing about this market?! Perhaps some better marketing would have helped![/p][/quote]I didnt know about this market either and i have lived in the area for 2 decades. They are not advertising, what a shame. piper2011
  • Score: 5

2:31pm Thu 10 Jul 14

King Joke says...

Would it perhaps help to hold a market in the, er, Market Square?

Out there I know but it might just work...
Would it perhaps help to hold a market in the, er, Market Square? Out there I know but it might just work... King Joke
  • Score: 0

6:56pm Thu 10 Jul 14

Andrew:Oxford says...

King Joke wrote:
You've got a cat in b|oody hell's chance of getting an event like this on Oxford Business Park. The landlord Goodman are fanatical about the place looking clean and tidy. Woe betide you if you park your car on an estate road or chain your bike to a lamp-post. They refused to entertain a bus service onto the Park, and resisted attempts by the County Council to put real-time information boards up, relating to the nearby Barns Rd bus stops.

Anything as untidy as market stalls would be right out. It's a pity as it's a good idea.
Part of the issue with the estate roads is the heavy hand of the city council and planning issues.

The office I used to work in there had 4 designated customer parking spaces. The furore from both the council and the park owners was unbelievable if a member of staff should happen to use one of them.

On the other hand... When the bypass was rebuilt for the business park, space was left to accommodate a light rail or tram connection into the park - it's a legacy of the old link into the works...

You can see the original connection on this website...

http://www.railmapon
line.com/UKIEMap.php
[quote][p][bold]King Joke[/bold] wrote: You've got a cat in b|oody hell's chance of getting an event like this on Oxford Business Park. The landlord Goodman are fanatical about the place looking clean and tidy. Woe betide you if you park your car on an estate road or chain your bike to a lamp-post. They refused to entertain a bus service onto the Park, and resisted attempts by the County Council to put real-time information boards up, relating to the nearby Barns Rd bus stops. Anything as untidy as market stalls would be right out. It's a pity as it's a good idea.[/p][/quote]Part of the issue with the estate roads is the heavy hand of the city council and planning issues. The office I used to work in there had 4 designated customer parking spaces. The furore from both the council and the park owners was unbelievable if a member of staff should happen to use one of them. On the other hand... When the bypass was rebuilt for the business park, space was left to accommodate a light rail or tram connection into the park - it's a legacy of the old link into the works... You can see the original connection on this website... http://www.railmapon line.com/UKIEMap.php Andrew:Oxford
  • Score: -1

11:28pm Thu 10 Jul 14

Patrick, Devon says...

I run a similar stall selling home produce in my local small town. Its a niche market which complements the supermarkets and doesnt try to compete. The key is the footfall - which is essential for every town business.

How do we reconcile the problems of traffic congestion, parking and public transport? Every town or city has its own potential bespoke solution. Sadly, few local councils in the UK seem able to think outside the box and seek a formula that works for that particular town.

I came across a good positve example recently - Welshpool in mid Wales. They have a bypass and good town centre traffic management. The supermarkets are on the fringe of the old town centre - its all within walking distance of public transport. The town is thriving with independant small shops, markets and pubs/cafes. Even the charity shops seem a class above the norm.

Any town or city must focus on how to attract people and what makes the place buzz. If it has the footfall, any wothwhile business will succeed. Changing economic and social circumstances should become an opportunity, not a problem, if both the individual business and the town are prepared to adapt.
I run a similar stall selling home produce in my local small town. Its a niche market which complements the supermarkets and doesnt try to compete. The key is the footfall - which is essential for every town business. How do we reconcile the problems of traffic congestion, parking and public transport? Every town or city has its own potential bespoke solution. Sadly, few local councils in the UK seem able to think outside the box and seek a formula that works for that particular town. I came across a good positve example recently - Welshpool in mid Wales. They have a bypass and good town centre traffic management. The supermarkets are on the fringe of the old town centre - its all within walking distance of public transport. The town is thriving with independant small shops, markets and pubs/cafes. Even the charity shops seem a class above the norm. Any town or city must focus on how to attract people and what makes the place buzz. If it has the footfall, any wothwhile business will succeed. Changing economic and social circumstances should become an opportunity, not a problem, if both the individual business and the town are prepared to adapt. Patrick, Devon
  • Score: 0

7:54am Fri 11 Jul 14

King Joke says...

Patrick, I'm not sure footfall is the issue here. THe Guildhall is just outside of the main shopping area and comments above suggest the event was poorly promoted (as well as running 90 min/week). Were it to run all day and be located in the main shopping precinct it would have done a lot better.

The Welshpool model sounds great, but towns in the South East are a lot more spread out because of the suburban housing. Shops on the outskirts of Abingdon are not walkable to the town centre and not as accessible as they might be in a town with a smaller footprint. Welshpool also kept its station whereas Abingdon did not!
Patrick, I'm not sure footfall is the issue here. THe Guildhall is just outside of the main shopping area and comments above suggest the event was poorly promoted (as well as running 90 min/week). Were it to run all day and be located in the main shopping precinct it would have done a lot better. The Welshpool model sounds great, but towns in the South East are a lot more spread out because of the suburban housing. Shops on the outskirts of Abingdon are not walkable to the town centre and not as accessible as they might be in a town with a smaller footprint. Welshpool also kept its station whereas Abingdon did not! King Joke
  • Score: 0

9:15am Fri 11 Jul 14

Man on the Green says...

I for one will really miss not only the delicious home baked cakes, fresh organic eggs (including wonderful ducks' eggs), the craft cards, wooden turned bits and pieces & treen, the delicious quiches, and above all the friendly welcome from these amazing ladies (and occasional man!). It is a double loss, as Abingdon (Marcham) is part of the WI heritage, and one of the places where it was born in 1915. An Oxfordshire JP and publisher named J W Robertson Scott wrote the first history of the movement in 1925 and emphasised many of the things that made this market such a valuable contribution to local life.

In my opinion, local groups should - at the very least - benefit from concessionary rates to use local facilities. After all, they have all paid for them through their local taxes already! This is a classic example of cutting one's nose off to spire one's face. The loss of the Country Market will further reduce the number of people who see Abingdon as a viable entity, and they will continue to look elsewhere. The heart of the town still beats, but is on a failing pacemaker. I fear we are entering the death throes of this once proud town, whose economic vitality has been destroyed by shortsighted political opportunism and squabbling.

Thank you one and all for the joy you brought over the years!
I for one will really miss not only the delicious home baked cakes, fresh organic eggs (including wonderful ducks' eggs), the craft cards, wooden turned bits and pieces & treen, the delicious quiches, and above all the friendly welcome from these amazing ladies (and occasional man!). It is a double loss, as Abingdon (Marcham) is part of the WI heritage, and one of the places where it was born in 1915. An Oxfordshire JP and publisher named J W Robertson Scott wrote the first history of the movement in 1925 and emphasised many of the things that made this market such a valuable contribution to local life. In my opinion, local groups should - at the very least - benefit from concessionary rates to use local facilities. After all, they have all paid for them through their local taxes already! This is a classic example of cutting one's nose off to spire one's face. The loss of the Country Market will further reduce the number of people who see Abingdon as a viable entity, and they will continue to look elsewhere. The heart of the town still beats, but is on a failing pacemaker. I fear we are entering the death throes of this once proud town, whose economic vitality has been destroyed by shortsighted political opportunism and squabbling. Thank you one and all for the joy you brought over the years! Man on the Green
  • Score: 1

9:24am Fri 11 Jul 14

King Joke says...

1. MOTG - no one is questioning the value of a local market. We can all make a difference by buying locally, cutting down food miles and supporting local businesses. I think we are however entitled to question the amateurish way in which the market has been organised and promoted, resulting in falling attendance.

If £45 can wipe out the margin earned, the finances of the operation are clearly very precarious. As turnover is falling, waiving the fee would only postpone the inevitable.

I think the comment about 'young people' shows how out of touch the organisers are and how unaware they are of how to make something like this work. I was incensed by it, not that I am a 'young person' myself!

2. A retraction: the lack of station is of little relevance. Welshpool station may help in delivering customers from far-flung communities, but Abingdon station were it still open couldn't really compete with today's bus service from Radley and Oxford .
1. MOTG - no one is questioning the value of a local market. We can all make a difference by buying locally, cutting down food miles and supporting local businesses. I think we are however entitled to question the amateurish way in which the market has been organised and promoted, resulting in falling attendance. If £45 can wipe out the margin earned, the finances of the operation are clearly very precarious. As turnover is falling, waiving the fee would only postpone the inevitable. I think the comment about 'young people' shows how out of touch the organisers are and how unaware they are of how to make something like this work. I was incensed by it, not that I am a 'young person' myself! 2. A retraction: the lack of station is of little relevance. Welshpool station may help in delivering customers from far-flung communities, but Abingdon station were it still open couldn't really compete with today's bus service from Radley [4 bph] and Oxford [10 bph]. King Joke
  • Score: 1

10:13am Fri 11 Jul 14

Patrick, Devon says...

Abingdon station, if it still existed, would have brought many more vistors into the town. Being directly on the rail network is much better than being a bus ride away.
Abingdon station, if it still existed, would have brought many more vistors into the town. Being directly on the rail network is much better than being a bus ride away. Patrick, Devon
  • Score: 2

10:29am Fri 11 Jul 14

King Joke says...

This is true in Welshpool Patrick, where the Cambrian links the town to others which have poor road and bus links.

Abingdon station however was at the end of a branch which, if it still ran, at best would have an hourly shuttle to Oxford calling at Radley only. It might be useful for those living in Abingdon to make outbound journeys on the rail network, but as a means of bringing people into the town, it could not compete with the frequent turn-up-and-go buses from Oxford and the decent 4bph service from Radley. Of the direct Oxford buses 6 bph (8 bph in the peaks) have free wi-fi and are either Citaros with air con or E400s with forced air. THis is a quality, frequent service and if you're in Oxford you're unlikely to organise around an hourly train when the bus is there on a TUAG basis.

Road links may be congested but they are there, making Abingdon a short drive from many nearby towns/villages which the train does not serve, such as Berinsfield, Wallingford, Didcot, Wantage/Grove, Marcham, Southfield/K Bagbpuize, Wootton and Cumnor.

I'll always support a reasonable reopening and Abingdon is no exception, but a means of boosting footfall in the town centre it is not.
This is true in Welshpool Patrick, where the Cambrian links the town to others which have poor road and bus links. Abingdon station however was at the end of a branch which, if it still ran, at best would have an hourly shuttle to Oxford calling at Radley only. It might be useful for those living in Abingdon to make outbound journeys on the rail network, but as a means of bringing people into the town, it could not compete with the frequent turn-up-and-go buses from Oxford and the decent 4bph service from Radley. Of the direct Oxford buses 6 bph (8 bph in the peaks) have free wi-fi and are either Citaros with air con or E400s with forced air. THis is a quality, frequent service and if you're in Oxford you're unlikely to organise around an hourly train when the bus is there on a TUAG basis. Road links may be congested but they are there, making Abingdon a short drive from many nearby towns/villages which the train does not serve, such as Berinsfield, Wallingford, Didcot, Wantage/Grove, Marcham, Southfield/K Bagbpuize, Wootton and Cumnor. I'll always support a reasonable reopening and Abingdon is no exception, but a means of boosting footfall in the town centre it is not. King Joke
  • Score: 0

11:28am Fri 11 Jul 14

Patrick, Devon says...

Instead of closing the Abindon branch in the 1960s, it would have been better to have turned the main line connection southwards and made Abingdon a terminus for some local Thames Valley trains.

Times have moved on however. I think it is now time to build a tramway alongside the main line between Didcot and Oxford for an enhanced local service. Network Rail say the stopping service on that stretch severely restricts capacity and the local service alone will not justify conventional four tracking.

Once a trunk tram route is established it will then be feasible to add spurs to Harwell and to Abindon and Wantage. There is no realistic alternative to acomodate growth and improve connectivity. A modern transport network would boost the economy and make ecourage local enterprise.
Instead of closing the Abindon branch in the 1960s, it would have been better to have turned the main line connection southwards and made Abingdon a terminus for some local Thames Valley trains. Times have moved on however. I think it is now time to build a tramway alongside the main line between Didcot and Oxford for an enhanced local service. Network Rail say the stopping service on that stretch severely restricts capacity and the local service alone will not justify conventional four tracking. Once a trunk tram route is established it will then be feasible to add spurs to Harwell and to Abindon and Wantage. There is no realistic alternative to acomodate growth and improve connectivity. A modern transport network would boost the economy and make ecourage local enterprise. Patrick, Devon
  • Score: 1

11:33am Fri 11 Jul 14

King Joke says...

Although we've strayed off topic, agreed with all of the above. THere is precious little room on most the NR metals around here for extra trains, but Abindgon and eventually points south would make sense as destinations on a light rail network encompassing places like Witney, Carterton, Cowley and maybe a couple of street routes replacing the busiest city bus routes.

Light rail has the advantage of running on street in places like Ab and Witney where the local station has long ago been built over.
Although we've strayed off topic, agreed with all of the above. THere is precious little room on most the NR metals around here for extra trains, but Abindgon and eventually points south would make sense as destinations on a light rail network encompassing places like Witney, Carterton, Cowley and maybe a couple of street routes replacing the busiest city bus routes. Light rail has the advantage of running on street in places like Ab and Witney where the local station has long ago been built over. King Joke
  • Score: 1

4:28pm Fri 11 Jul 14

EMBOX2 says...

Problem is, with Abingdon, precious little of the original track bed remains, some is a footpath, but most has housing/roads/car parks and Waitrose on it.

I fully support an Oxon Light Rail scheme. I divide my time between Abingdon and Sheffield (in the latter at this moment) and the tram system here is truly fantastic - leaving buses to serve only the areas the tram cannot (due to Sheffield being very hilly!). The tram is also being expanded so it clearly works.

A light rail scheme to lift the local stopping services off the mainline, and a scheme that links Didcot, Abingdon, Wantage, Oxford and Bicester would be a massive boost to the economy. It won't be cheap, but it will be heavily used IF it has stops in the right places and is a sensible price - it will pay for itself in the end.

Personally I would favour it running up the side of the A34 and spur off to Didcot/Grove at Milton Interchange (where it could run alongside the GWR mainline), spur again at A34 Abingdon North for a run to Peachcroft (or similar) and then up to Oxford and spur at Hinksey Hill to again link up with the Cherwell Valley line, to Oxford Station and maybe even use the BMW line and stop at Blackbird Leys?

Would be cheaper and less hassle than adding lots of new bridges over the Thames, essentially building a road but then put track on it.
Problem is, with Abingdon, precious little of the original track bed remains, some is a footpath, but most has housing/roads/car parks and Waitrose on it. I fully support an Oxon Light Rail scheme. I divide my time between Abingdon and Sheffield (in the latter at this moment) and the tram system here is truly fantastic - leaving buses to serve only the areas the tram cannot (due to Sheffield being very hilly!). The tram is also being expanded so it clearly works. A light rail scheme to lift the local stopping services off the mainline, and a scheme that links Didcot, Abingdon, Wantage, Oxford and Bicester would be a massive boost to the economy. It won't be cheap, but it will be heavily used IF it has stops in the right places and is a sensible price - it will pay for itself in the end. Personally I would favour it running up the side of the A34 and spur off to Didcot/Grove at Milton Interchange (where it could run alongside the GWR mainline), spur again at A34 Abingdon North for a run to Peachcroft (or similar) and then up to Oxford and spur at Hinksey Hill to again link up with the Cherwell Valley line, to Oxford Station and maybe even use the BMW line and stop at Blackbird Leys? Would be cheaper and less hassle than adding lots of new bridges over the Thames, essentially building a road but then put track on it. EMBOX2
  • Score: 1

4:43pm Fri 11 Jul 14

King Joke says...

True - and you only need to build a very narrow formation compared with a road - running on rails the trams can pass very close to each other at 80 km/h quite safely.
True - and you only need to build a very narrow formation compared with a road - running on rails the trams can pass very close to each other at 80 km/h quite safely. King Joke
  • Score: 1

12:02am Sat 12 Jul 14

Dilligaf2010 says...

They do have a point though, a lot of young people don't know how to cook, but that's because they don't get taught at school, and many parents don't have the time to teach them at home
They do have a point though, a lot of young people don't know how to cook, but that's because they don't get taught at school, and many parents don't have the time to teach them at home Dilligaf2010
  • Score: 0

12:04am Sat 12 Jul 14

Dilligaf2010 says...

King Joke wrote:
True - and you only need to build a very narrow formation compared with a road - running on rails the trams can pass very close to each other at 80 km/h quite safely.
Could even go for Maglev, takes up less space, and is much quicker.
[quote][p][bold]King Joke[/bold] wrote: True - and you only need to build a very narrow formation compared with a road - running on rails the trams can pass very close to each other at 80 km/h quite safely.[/p][/quote]Could even go for Maglev, takes up less space, and is much quicker. Dilligaf2010
  • Score: 0

4:34am Sat 12 Jul 14

The New Private Eye says...

Dilligaf2010 wrote:
They do have a point though, a lot of young people don't know how to cook, but that's because they don't get taught at school, and many parents don't have the time to teach them at home
It is not that the parents don't have time, they don't know how to cook themselves. They think that popping an Iceland carton into the microwave for 3 minutes on 900 watts is cooking. Sad but true. Go to any supermarket abroad (except USA) and the frozen section is a fraction of ours here.
[quote][p][bold]Dilligaf2010[/bold] wrote: They do have a point though, a lot of young people don't know how to cook, but that's because they don't get taught at school, and many parents don't have the time to teach them at home[/p][/quote]It is not that the parents don't have time, they don't know how to cook themselves. They think that popping an Iceland carton into the microwave for 3 minutes on 900 watts is cooking. Sad but true. Go to any supermarket abroad (except USA) and the frozen section is a fraction of ours here. The New Private Eye
  • Score: 0

8:04am Sun 13 Jul 14

LadyJ says...

Surely a key problem is that it's on a Friday when people are at work! Why not try switching to Saturday morning for a bit - and advertising, as others here have said?
Surely a key problem is that it's on a Friday when people are at work! Why not try switching to Saturday morning for a bit - and advertising, as others here have said? LadyJ
  • Score: 1
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