Design a lorry sticker to keep cyclists safe

Jessica Friend with Tony Baldry MP and Gus the Gorilla

Jessica Friend with Tony Baldry MP and Gus the Gorilla

First published in Wantage/Grove Herald Series: Photograph of the Author by , Health reporter, also covering Kidlington. Call me on 01865 425271

CYCLING around Oxford, Jessica Friend knows first hand the dangers faced from lorries.

So she hit on an idea that the 22-year-old hopes will keep two-wheelers safe on the UK’s roads.

The organisation behind the How’s My Driving? signs is backing her bid to come up with a lorry sticker to warn cyclists against trying to pass on the inside.

Miss Friend has launched a competition to find an eye-catching design to go on more than 1,000 lorries nationwide.

She was inspired to act when an uncle was knocked off his bike after being clipped by a lorry in London.

He escaped with minor injuries, but accidents involving cyclists trying to pass large vehicles on the inside, particularly at junctions, are often fatal.

She said: “Some cyclists pull alongside a large vehicle and think they can go off faster than a bus.

“I cycle along routes where there is lots of space for you, but as soon as I get to a roundabout or junction I dismount.”

The signs would educate cyclists but also make drivers more aware of the dangers, she said.

Miss Friend, who lives in Sibford Ferris, near Banbury, added: “I think it is really important, especially in Oxford because of it’s cycling culture.

“It is not just an issue for London. It is really key in places like Oxford and Cambridge.”

Ross Smith, director at How’s My Driving?, said he was delighted to help after being contacted by the former University of East Anglia student.

He said: “When you are on a bike you don’t have a lot of time to read a notice so we are hoping people will come up with an eye-catching design or slogan.”

The social enterprise is paying for the competition and has four national haulage firms signed up to take the winning design.

He said: “Cyclists are the only category of road user where deaths have increased in the last two years. We want to do something about that.”

Banbury MP Tony Baldry launched the InTandem competition with the help of its mascot, Gus the Gorilla.

He said: “Road safety is an important issue not just in urban areas, but also in rural areas such as those surrounding Banbury.

“All road users, whether they are cyclists or drivers, must learn to give each other enough space.”

  • To enter, visit the website intandem competition.com. The closing date is Monday.

Comments (16)

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7:33am Thu 26 Apr 12

davyboy says...

the same stickers should be put on ALL large vehicles
the same stickers should be put on ALL large vehicles davyboy
  • Score: 0

7:49am Thu 26 Apr 12

livid99 says...

If cyclists in Oxford are trying to improve their chances of survival, maybe they should consider using LIGHTS at night !!
The number of people cycling around the city in dark clothing with no lights on at in the evenings is incredible.
If cyclists in Oxford are trying to improve their chances of survival, maybe they should consider using LIGHTS at night !! The number of people cycling around the city in dark clothing with no lights on at in the evenings is incredible. livid99
  • Score: 0

9:03am Thu 26 Apr 12

Cathena says...

Cyclists should also remember lorry drivers cannot see them when alongside and close to the cab. Perhaps the schoolchildren could produce a good poster, they often do for other things.
Cyclists should also remember lorry drivers cannot see them when alongside and close to the cab. Perhaps the schoolchildren could produce a good poster, they often do for other things. Cathena
  • Score: 0

9:08am Thu 26 Apr 12

Abberdon says...

"I cycle along routes where there is lots of space for you, but as soon as I get to a roundabout or junction I dismount.”

That is just plain silly, counter productive, and a sign that she is not a confident rider. She should attend a bike skills course to learn how to handle traffic.

As for her sign, 'do not overtake turning vehicle' is a simple message to display on the back of all commercial vehicles, but it has to be in conjunction with some education about not slipping up the inside of vehicles where there is insufficient space.

Also required is a holding box at the head of all the traffic, where bikes can sit in front of traffic, coupled with a bike traffic signal that goes ahead of the vehicle green light, allowing bikes to take off first.

Ideally, an green lane on the inside against the kerb should be added in by, if possible, reducing the width of other lanes to make space.

Overall though, greater education for all road users is the only solution. But this never ends, and has to start with parental example and constant public education, be it about bikes, or speeding, or drink driving and on it goes.
"I cycle along routes where there is lots of space for you, but as soon as I get to a roundabout or junction I dismount.” That is just plain silly, counter productive, and a sign that she is not a confident rider. She should attend a bike skills course to learn how to handle traffic. As for her sign, 'do not overtake turning vehicle' is a simple message to display on the back of all commercial vehicles, but it has to be in conjunction with some education about not slipping up the inside of vehicles where there is insufficient space. Also required is a holding box at the head of all the traffic, where bikes can sit in front of traffic, coupled with a bike traffic signal that goes ahead of the vehicle green light, allowing bikes to take off first. Ideally, an green lane on the inside against the kerb should be added in by, if possible, reducing the width of other lanes to make space. Overall though, greater education for all road users is the only solution. But this never ends, and has to start with parental example and constant public education, be it about bikes, or speeding, or drink driving and on it goes. Abberdon
  • Score: 0

9:12am Thu 26 Apr 12

snert says...

Somehow I think this is one of those things where it'll be a lot of effort for no gain. Cyclists dislike motorists because they think they don't look out for them when more often than not they don't see them because they don't have lights or aren't wearing something easily visible. Also the vast majority of cyclists I see ignore things like traffic lights, all types of crossings, one way streets, give way signs, the list is very long and cyclists wonder why they get hit when they're doing something that isn't within the accepted rules of the road.

Play by the rules that motorists adhere to and maybe you'll stand a better chance of survival as motorists will be able to make a more accurate assessment of your intent on the road. Same goes for motorbikes.

I see THINK BIKE stickers all over the place. Stick a massive sticker on the dashboard of a motorbike that says THINK CAR to remind them to play by the same rules.

If we all played by the same rules there would be less accidents.
Somehow I think this is one of those things where it'll be a lot of effort for no gain. Cyclists dislike motorists because they think they don't look out for them when more often than not they don't see them because they don't have lights or aren't wearing something easily visible. Also the vast majority of cyclists I see ignore things like traffic lights, all types of crossings, one way streets, give way signs, the list is very long and cyclists wonder why they get hit when they're doing something that isn't within the accepted rules of the road. Play by the rules that motorists adhere to and maybe you'll stand a better chance of survival as motorists will be able to make a more accurate assessment of your intent on the road. Same goes for motorbikes. I see THINK BIKE stickers all over the place. Stick a massive sticker on the dashboard of a motorbike that says THINK CAR to remind them to play by the same rules. If we all played by the same rules there would be less accidents. snert
  • Score: 0

9:16am Thu 26 Apr 12

snert says...

“Some cyclists pull alongside a large vehicle and think they can go off faster than a bus"... actually a bike will accelerate faster than a bus and will be across the junction faster because of the weight difference. Same with lorries. Cars on the other hand they may not beat off the mark.

Cars at lights don't often look in their passenger side mirror to see if anything is coming up the inside which is dangerous when turning left as you might take a cyclist out. That said, if you're a cyclist, don't be stupid. If you're going straight on, don't assume the vehicle beside you is doing the same regardless of the indicators.
“Some cyclists pull alongside a large vehicle and think they can go off faster than a bus"... actually a bike will accelerate faster than a bus and will be across the junction faster because of the weight difference. Same with lorries. Cars on the other hand they may not beat off the mark. Cars at lights don't often look in their passenger side mirror to see if anything is coming up the inside which is dangerous when turning left as you might take a cyclist out. That said, if you're a cyclist, don't be stupid. If you're going straight on, don't assume the vehicle beside you is doing the same regardless of the indicators. snert
  • Score: 0

9:20am Thu 26 Apr 12

Abberdon says...

DRivers of vehicles have a basic responsibility to look, to see and to take responsibility for their actions.

The 'I never saw him' line simply shows that insufficient attention was being paid by the driver.

Of course, lights at night, reflectors too, are a responsibility for cyclists too but this 'wear something bright' lark is simply not on.

Even when cyclists do wear bright clothes, they still get assaulted by bad drivers.

When will there be a call for all cars to be bright yellow, and a ban on black, blue, red and silver-grey cars, eh?

AS for suggesting that motorists 'adhere' to road rules, that is clearly claptrap. Do tell us all what all the tow trucks are doing will you?

Are they carting off broken bikes, or smashed cars driven by dangerous dolts who show disregard for all on the road?

I have never seen a bike tow truck myself.
DRivers of vehicles have a basic responsibility to look, to see and to take responsibility for their actions. The 'I never saw him' line simply shows that insufficient attention was being paid by the driver. Of course, lights at night, reflectors too, are a responsibility for cyclists too but this 'wear something bright' lark is simply not on. Even when cyclists do wear bright clothes, they still get assaulted by bad drivers. When will there be a call for all cars to be bright yellow, and a ban on black, blue, red and silver-grey cars, eh? AS for suggesting that motorists 'adhere' to road rules, that is clearly claptrap. Do tell us all what all the tow trucks are doing will you? Are they carting off broken bikes, or smashed cars driven by dangerous dolts who show disregard for all on the road? I have never seen a bike tow truck myself. Abberdon
  • Score: 0

9:42am Thu 26 Apr 12

Dilligaf2010 says...

The sign should simply say "Use your common sense"......
The sign should simply say "Use your common sense"...... Dilligaf2010
  • Score: 0

10:30am Thu 26 Apr 12

Bart Simpsonxxx says...

This is a very good idea, the only problem being is that cyclists will ignore it.
'Abberdon' you really make yourself sound stupid withb your unfounded comments. I have yet to see any cyclists be assaulted by any car drivers, but I have seen plenty of cyclists give abuse to car drivers.
This is a very good idea, the only problem being is that cyclists will ignore it. 'Abberdon' you really make yourself sound stupid withb your unfounded comments. I have yet to see any cyclists be assaulted by any car drivers, but I have seen plenty of cyclists give abuse to car drivers. Bart Simpsonxxx
  • Score: 0

11:32am Thu 26 Apr 12

Abberdon says...

I've seen your behaviour on your cartton strip Bart. You're not the sharpest tool in the bag, eh?

I think running into riders, dooring them, turning left into them and so on counts as an assault.

Love your wife's hair though.
I've seen your behaviour on your cartton strip Bart. You're not the sharpest tool in the bag, eh? I think running into riders, dooring them, turning left into them and so on counts as an assault. Love your wife's hair though. Abberdon
  • Score: 0

12:59pm Thu 26 Apr 12

livid99 says...

Try using one of the pedestrian crossings on Cowley Road. Press the button and wait until the light changes and it is safe to cross i.e RED light for traffic. Any cyclists approaching the crossing will NOT stop. They break the rules on a regular basis, and then have the nerve to have a go at motorists when we point out their faults. Inconsiderate cyclists deserve all the abuse they get.
Try using one of the pedestrian crossings on Cowley Road. Press the button and wait until the light changes and it is safe to cross i.e RED light for traffic. Any cyclists approaching the crossing will NOT stop. They break the rules on a regular basis, and then have the nerve to have a go at motorists when we point out their faults. Inconsiderate cyclists deserve all the abuse they get. livid99
  • Score: 0

1:27pm Thu 26 Apr 12

Adrian1 says...

Travelling as a pedestrian, cyclist and car driver I have seen stupid in all catagories. That having been said if the same numbers of motorists drove like I've witnessed that number of cyclists ride there would be way more carnage on the roads. I feel building cycle lanes along all disused rail lines and indeed alongside all operating rail lines would see the best use of cycle lane building, it simply removes the many interfaces of roundabouts and T-junctions that cycles and motor vehicles are constantly brought together on. How to pay? As a cyclist I'd actually welcome bicycle registration, compulsory insurance and road tax! I use the roads too. That way my bicycle stands a slightly better chance of recovery from theft, I can readily pay for any accidental damage attributed and contribute to a safer network.
Travelling as a pedestrian, cyclist and car driver I have seen stupid in all catagories. That having been said if the same numbers of motorists drove like I've witnessed that number of cyclists ride there would be way more carnage on the roads. I feel building cycle lanes along all disused rail lines and indeed alongside all operating rail lines would see the best use of cycle lane building, it simply removes the many interfaces of roundabouts and T-junctions that cycles and motor vehicles are constantly brought together on. How to pay? As a cyclist I'd actually welcome bicycle registration, compulsory insurance and road tax! I use the roads too. That way my bicycle stands a slightly better chance of recovery from theft, I can readily pay for any accidental damage attributed and contribute to a safer network. Adrian1
  • Score: 0

3:40pm Thu 26 Apr 12

EMBOX1 says...

Anything sensible to make the roads safer is a good idea in my book, but I do think it's time for a proper cycling proficency test - not just cycling around a playground, and something you should have to do again when you're older. A cycling "licence" isn't a bad idea (give the DVLA something to do!).

I love cycling but I see so much shoddy bikemanship it's unreal, and Oxford seems horrendous for it.

The only way we got driving standards up was to introduce a driving test and serious ramifications if you did something dangerous. Cyclists don't have that same cloud hanging over them.

If we all use the same tarmac, we all need to play by the same rules....?
Anything sensible to make the roads safer is a good idea in my book, but I do think it's time for a proper cycling proficency test - not just cycling around a playground, and something you should have to do again when you're older. A cycling "licence" isn't a bad idea (give the DVLA something to do!). I love cycling but I see so much shoddy bikemanship it's unreal, and Oxford seems horrendous for it. The only way we got driving standards up was to introduce a driving test and serious ramifications if you did something dangerous. Cyclists don't have that same cloud hanging over them. If we all use the same tarmac, we all need to play by the same rules....? EMBOX1
  • Score: 0

6:46pm Thu 26 Apr 12

King Joke says...

Never EVER overtake an HGV or a bus on the nearside. It's as simple as that. Either stay behind, or when the large vehicle is going slowly enough, overtake on the offside. You're much more visible on the offside than you are on the nearside. Do make sure the vehicle isn't signalling to turn right though!
Never EVER overtake an HGV or a bus on the nearside. It's as simple as that. Either stay behind, or when the large vehicle is going slowly enough, overtake on the offside. You're much more visible on the offside than you are on the nearside. Do make sure the vehicle isn't signalling to turn right though! King Joke
  • Score: 0

9:05pm Fri 27 Apr 12

cuzco654 says...

EMBOX1 you have a point: Same tarmac = Same rules, it’s only fair. As a bus driver I am held to a higher standard of driving by law because I am a professional with higher skills and more training than ordinary motorists (same for lorry drivers). However we are still human; we cannot read people’s minds nor do we have superhuman or x-ray vision.

Cyclists:
If it is dark or raining or foggy you should have lights on your bike (BRIGHT lights, not a single LED! Something that will make you visible in the myriad of car headlights) Hi-viz helps a lot too.

Please remember that if it is raining then vehicle mirrors will be covered in raindrops and visibility will be reduced A LOT and if it is dark then cars headlights will dazzle drivers and anything less bright will be near-invisible until it is very close (by then it may be too late)

Large vehicles have large BLIND SPOTS, never undertake and pay attention to indicators (Those flashing orange lights)

If you are sharing a road with other traffic, please look carefully before you change direction and fit a mirror to your bike

Drivers:
All of the above. Cyclists may not have had the training that drivers go through.

Cycling takes physical effort which distracts from concentration on the road

Cyclists may swerve to avoid hazards that a driver would ignore (sunken drain cover, large puddle, etc)

I have great respect for the law-abiding cyclists of Oxford, of which there are many. I cycle a lot myself, and it is aggravating to see that minority of people who make life difficult for others.

Oxford is a busy city with a crowded road network which we all have to share; the only way we can do this is if we all follow the rules of the road, treat our fellow road users with respect and decency and use our common sense.
EMBOX1 you have a point: Same tarmac = Same rules, it’s only fair. As a bus driver I am held to a higher standard of driving by law because I am a professional with higher skills and more training than ordinary motorists (same for lorry drivers). However we are still human; we cannot read people’s minds nor do we have superhuman or x-ray vision. Cyclists: If it is dark or raining or foggy you should have lights on your bike (BRIGHT lights, not a single LED! Something that will make you visible in the myriad of car headlights) Hi-viz helps a lot too. Please remember that if it is raining then vehicle mirrors will be covered in raindrops and visibility will be reduced A LOT and if it is dark then cars headlights will dazzle drivers and anything less bright will be near-invisible until it is very close (by then it may be too late) Large vehicles have large BLIND SPOTS, never undertake and pay attention to indicators (Those flashing orange lights) If you are sharing a road with other traffic, please look carefully before you change direction and fit a mirror to your bike Drivers: All of the above. Cyclists may not have had the training that drivers go through. Cycling takes physical effort which distracts from concentration on the road Cyclists may swerve to avoid hazards that a driver would ignore (sunken drain cover, large puddle, etc) I have great respect for the law-abiding cyclists of Oxford, of which there are many. I cycle a lot myself, and it is aggravating to see that minority of people who make life difficult for others. Oxford is a busy city with a crowded road network which we all have to share; the only way we can do this is if we all follow the rules of the road, treat our fellow road users with respect and decency and use our common sense. cuzco654
  • Score: 0

12:56pm Sat 28 Apr 12

hatofthecat says...

Rule number one is ride defensively. If you haven't made eye contact with the driver in the cab or that lorry he hasn't seen you. Its that simple.

I drive as much as I cycle and see stupid actions from both but which is more dangerous... the cyclist going over an empty crossing on red or the car driver that thinks its okay to overtake a bike without a proper gap then cut straight back in on your bike ??

PS can someone at Brookes Uni (jumped up FE college more like...) advise their students how to actually pedal a bike ? ..tip its NOT with your instep and knees jutting out sideways..!
Rule number one is ride defensively. If you haven't made eye contact with the driver in the cab or that lorry he hasn't seen you. Its that simple. I drive as much as I cycle and see stupid actions from both but which is more dangerous... the cyclist going over an empty crossing on red or the car driver that thinks its okay to overtake a bike without a proper gap then cut straight back in on your bike ?? PS can someone at Brookes Uni (jumped up FE college more like...) advise their students how to actually pedal a bike ? ..tip its NOT with your instep and knees jutting out sideways..! hatofthecat
  • Score: 0

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