Safety concerns over rise in cycling injuries

Rodney Rose

Rodney Rose

First published in News

CYCLISTS have called for better safety measures after figures show deaths and injuries have more than doubled in the past decade.

Some 58 cyclists were killed or seriously injured in Oxfordshire in 2011 compared to just 27 in 2001.

Lisa Harker lost her unborn child after being hit by an 18-tonne lorry at the junction of Botley Road and Roger Dudman Way in 2004.

The 43-year-old said: “I think it is a real shame that Oxford has such high levels of serious incidents and deaths.

“We are a cycling city and we ought to be proud of our cycle safety.

“The thing that most devastated me after my accident was finding out someone else had been killed in the same spot in the same circumstances and nothing had been done.”

North Oxford resident Bonnie McMullen, 69, of Osberton Road, has twice been knocked off by people opening car doors while husband James was toppled in a hit-and-run smash.

She said: “The city could do an awful lot more in making cycle lanes that are really cycle lanes, not just lines in the pavement that cars park on.”

Her husband, 73, backed calls for a study of blackspots, saying his 2010 collision in Woodstock Road, by Moreton Road, was “obviously” a flashpoint.

He said of the figures: “I would have thought that the 20mph limits that were introduced would have helped but they don’t seem to have.”

Police enforcement of the 2009 limits only began this year.

Oxfordshire County Council wants money from the Government’s £15m Cycle Safety Fund to improve dangerous junctions.

Nationally the number of all accidents involving bicycles have gone down by 23 per cent. East Oxford Green Party county councillor Larry Sanders, of the Green Party, described the county figures as “frightening”.

He said: “We certainly know that some of the most terrible accidents have involved large construction vehicles that are difficult to manoeuvre, operating in areas where there is a high concentration of cyclists.”

Speed limits and weight restrictions could help, he said.

Recent tragedies include the death of Joanna Braithwaite in October last year. She was struck by a cement mixer in North Oxford Driver Stephen Bateman admitted causing death by careless driving and will be sentenced next month.

Deputy council leader Rodney Rose, below, said: “We know where the problems are. All we need is the funding to put it right.

“There has been an big uptake in cycling. When you get more cyclists, you possibly get more accidents.”

It is hoping for £200,000 to improve Abingdon’s Wootton Road/Dunmore Road/Copenhagen Way roundabout.

Earlier this year Oxford City Council members voted to spend more than £800,000 on improving the city’s cycling infrastructure.

Comments (7)

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4:28pm Fri 14 Sep 12

ger elttil OX2 0EJ says...

Nationally cycling accidents have gone down, but not here. I personally think that it is more to do with the attitude of some cyclists, rather than road layouts, or competence. We have to just accept that there are times that we must stop and wait on our journey, be that at road junctions, in traffic, or just simply when waiting to pass parked vehicles, when I am in a hurry I am guilty of ignoring the above, and am just as likely to use the pavement, jump a Red light, or pull over without looking or sticking my arm out. But when I look back it is all rather silly to risk my life to save me a couple of minutes. All road users need to start taking a duty of care for themselves and not expect others to cover for their misdemenours, then and only then will Oxford's roads become safer.
Nationally cycling accidents have gone down, but not here. I personally think that it is more to do with the attitude of some cyclists, rather than road layouts, or competence. We have to just accept that there are times that we must stop and wait on our journey, be that at road junctions, in traffic, or just simply when waiting to pass parked vehicles, when I am in a hurry I am guilty of ignoring the above, and am just as likely to use the pavement, jump a Red light, or pull over without looking or sticking my arm out. But when I look back it is all rather silly to risk my life to save me a couple of minutes. All road users need to start taking a duty of care for themselves and not expect others to cover for their misdemenours, then and only then will Oxford's roads become safer. ger elttil OX2 0EJ
  • Score: -46

5:20pm Fri 14 Sep 12

downfader says...

ger elttil OX2 0EJ wrote:
Nationally cycling accidents have gone down, but not here. I personally think that it is more to do with the attitude of some cyclists, rather than road layouts, or competence. We have to just accept that there are times that we must stop and wait on our journey, be that at road junctions, in traffic, or just simply when waiting to pass parked vehicles, when I am in a hurry I am guilty of ignoring the above, and am just as likely to use the pavement, jump a Red light, or pull over without looking or sticking my arm out. But when I look back it is all rather silly to risk my life to save me a couple of minutes. All road users need to start taking a duty of care for themselves and not expect others to cover for their misdemenours, then and only then will Oxford's roads become safer.
No. They've gone up 8% nationally, too..!

Have you read the reports by the Department for Transport and Police forces? Its not down to cyclist attitudes in the main. A large percentage is down to horrendous driving.

You cannot then suggest attitude is a problem when you yourself admit to riding in a manner that is unlawful and possibly inconsiderate.

Biggest factor for safety would be if we took the Dutch approach Nationally. Next biggest would be for ordinary drivers to switch to the bike to a) cut back on short journeys and b) get a feel for what its like on two wheels.

If a few drivers took part in a Bikeability scheme they could also learn a heck of a lot.
[quote][p][bold]ger elttil OX2 0EJ[/bold] wrote: Nationally cycling accidents have gone down, but not here. I personally think that it is more to do with the attitude of some cyclists, rather than road layouts, or competence. We have to just accept that there are times that we must stop and wait on our journey, be that at road junctions, in traffic, or just simply when waiting to pass parked vehicles, when I am in a hurry I am guilty of ignoring the above, and am just as likely to use the pavement, jump a Red light, or pull over without looking or sticking my arm out. But when I look back it is all rather silly to risk my life to save me a couple of minutes. All road users need to start taking a duty of care for themselves and not expect others to cover for their misdemenours, then and only then will Oxford's roads become safer.[/p][/quote]No. They've gone up 8% nationally, too..! Have you read the reports by the Department for Transport and Police forces? Its not down to cyclist attitudes in the main. A large percentage is down to horrendous driving. You cannot then suggest attitude is a problem when you yourself admit to riding in a manner that is unlawful and possibly inconsiderate. Biggest factor for safety would be if we took the Dutch approach Nationally. Next biggest would be for ordinary drivers to switch to the bike to a) cut back on short journeys and b) get a feel for what its like on two wheels. If a few drivers took part in a Bikeability scheme they could also learn a heck of a lot. downfader
  • Score: 4

6:03pm Fri 14 Sep 12

ger elttil OX2 0EJ says...

downfader wrote:
ger elttil OX2 0EJ wrote:
Nationally cycling accidents have gone down, but not here. I personally think that it is more to do with the attitude of some cyclists, rather than road layouts, or competence. We have to just accept that there are times that we must stop and wait on our journey, be that at road junctions, in traffic, or just simply when waiting to pass parked vehicles, when I am in a hurry I am guilty of ignoring the above, and am just as likely to use the pavement, jump a Red light, or pull over without looking or sticking my arm out. But when I look back it is all rather silly to risk my life to save me a couple of minutes. All road users need to start taking a duty of care for themselves and not expect others to cover for their misdemenours, then and only then will Oxford's roads become safer.
No. They've gone up 8% nationally, too..!

Have you read the reports by the Department for Transport and Police forces? Its not down to cyclist attitudes in the main. A large percentage is down to horrendous driving.

You cannot then suggest attitude is a problem when you yourself admit to riding in a manner that is unlawful and possibly inconsiderate.

Biggest factor for safety would be if we took the Dutch approach Nationally. Next biggest would be for ordinary drivers to switch to the bike to a) cut back on short journeys and b) get a feel for what its like on two wheels.

If a few drivers took part in a Bikeability scheme they could also learn a heck of a lot.
Nationally the number of all accidents involving bicycles have gone down by 23 per cent. East Oxford Green Party county councillor Larry Sanders, of the Green Party, described the county figures as “frightening”.

Sorry I can only take my figures from the story I commented on.
[quote][p][bold]downfader[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]ger elttil OX2 0EJ[/bold] wrote: Nationally cycling accidents have gone down, but not here. I personally think that it is more to do with the attitude of some cyclists, rather than road layouts, or competence. We have to just accept that there are times that we must stop and wait on our journey, be that at road junctions, in traffic, or just simply when waiting to pass parked vehicles, when I am in a hurry I am guilty of ignoring the above, and am just as likely to use the pavement, jump a Red light, or pull over without looking or sticking my arm out. But when I look back it is all rather silly to risk my life to save me a couple of minutes. All road users need to start taking a duty of care for themselves and not expect others to cover for their misdemenours, then and only then will Oxford's roads become safer.[/p][/quote]No. They've gone up 8% nationally, too..! Have you read the reports by the Department for Transport and Police forces? Its not down to cyclist attitudes in the main. A large percentage is down to horrendous driving. You cannot then suggest attitude is a problem when you yourself admit to riding in a manner that is unlawful and possibly inconsiderate. Biggest factor for safety would be if we took the Dutch approach Nationally. Next biggest would be for ordinary drivers to switch to the bike to a) cut back on short journeys and b) get a feel for what its like on two wheels. If a few drivers took part in a Bikeability scheme they could also learn a heck of a lot.[/p][/quote]Nationally the number of all accidents involving bicycles have gone down by 23 per cent. East Oxford Green Party county councillor Larry Sanders, of the Green Party, described the county figures as “frightening”. Sorry I can only take my figures from the story I commented on. ger elttil OX2 0EJ
  • Score: -45

8:03pm Fri 14 Sep 12

downfader says...

ger elttil OX2 0EJ wrote:
downfader wrote:
ger elttil OX2 0EJ wrote:
Nationally cycling accidents have gone down, but not here. I personally think that it is more to do with the attitude of some cyclists, rather than road layouts, or competence. We have to just accept that there are times that we must stop and wait on our journey, be that at road junctions, in traffic, or just simply when waiting to pass parked vehicles, when I am in a hurry I am guilty of ignoring the above, and am just as likely to use the pavement, jump a Red light, or pull over without looking or sticking my arm out. But when I look back it is all rather silly to risk my life to save me a couple of minutes. All road users need to start taking a duty of care for themselves and not expect others to cover for their misdemenours, then and only then will Oxford's roads become safer.
No. They've gone up 8% nationally, too..!

Have you read the reports by the Department for Transport and Police forces? Its not down to cyclist attitudes in the main. A large percentage is down to horrendous driving.

You cannot then suggest attitude is a problem when you yourself admit to riding in a manner that is unlawful and possibly inconsiderate.

Biggest factor for safety would be if we took the Dutch approach Nationally. Next biggest would be for ordinary drivers to switch to the bike to a) cut back on short journeys and b) get a feel for what its like on two wheels.

If a few drivers took part in a Bikeability scheme they could also learn a heck of a lot.
Nationally the number of all accidents involving bicycles have gone down by 23 per cent. East Oxford Green Party county councillor Larry Sanders, of the Green Party, described the county figures as “frightening”.

Sorry I can only take my figures from the story I commented on.
But it hasnt. I think someone might have gotten their numbers in a twist. This has been widely reported on both the British Cycling and CTC websites, it has even been featured in the Guardian's Bike Blog.
[quote][p][bold]ger elttil OX2 0EJ[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]downfader[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]ger elttil OX2 0EJ[/bold] wrote: Nationally cycling accidents have gone down, but not here. I personally think that it is more to do with the attitude of some cyclists, rather than road layouts, or competence. We have to just accept that there are times that we must stop and wait on our journey, be that at road junctions, in traffic, or just simply when waiting to pass parked vehicles, when I am in a hurry I am guilty of ignoring the above, and am just as likely to use the pavement, jump a Red light, or pull over without looking or sticking my arm out. But when I look back it is all rather silly to risk my life to save me a couple of minutes. All road users need to start taking a duty of care for themselves and not expect others to cover for their misdemenours, then and only then will Oxford's roads become safer.[/p][/quote]No. They've gone up 8% nationally, too..! Have you read the reports by the Department for Transport and Police forces? Its not down to cyclist attitudes in the main. A large percentage is down to horrendous driving. You cannot then suggest attitude is a problem when you yourself admit to riding in a manner that is unlawful and possibly inconsiderate. Biggest factor for safety would be if we took the Dutch approach Nationally. Next biggest would be for ordinary drivers to switch to the bike to a) cut back on short journeys and b) get a feel for what its like on two wheels. If a few drivers took part in a Bikeability scheme they could also learn a heck of a lot.[/p][/quote]Nationally the number of all accidents involving bicycles have gone down by 23 per cent. East Oxford Green Party county councillor Larry Sanders, of the Green Party, described the county figures as “frightening”. Sorry I can only take my figures from the story I commented on.[/p][/quote]But it hasnt. I think someone might have gotten their numbers in a twist. This has been widely reported on both the British Cycling and CTC websites, it has even been featured in the Guardian's Bike Blog. downfader
  • Score: 5

9:29am Sun 16 Sep 12

Severian says...

Cyclist have to share some of the blame, given some of the absolutely stupid things I've seen.

At a junction in Oxford a couple of years ago a cyclist in front of me cycled straight through a red light while texting on his mobile phone!

Many, if not most, cyclists I see seem to think that the Highway Code doesn't apply to them (things like traffic lights, pelican crossings, one way streets and pavements don't seem to have any rules as far as cyclists are concerned).
Cyclist have to share some of the blame, given some of the absolutely stupid things I've seen. At a junction in Oxford a couple of years ago a cyclist in front of me cycled straight through a red light while texting on his mobile phone! Many, if not most, cyclists I see seem to think that the Highway Code doesn't apply to them (things like traffic lights, pelican crossings, one way streets and pavements don't seem to have any rules as far as cyclists are concerned). Severian
  • Score: 0

8:43am Tue 18 Sep 12

Sophia says...

Biggest threat to cyclists in central Oxford is pedestrians jaywalking, steeping off the curb without looking.

Pedestrians should have to be licensed and insured, and subject to drink/walking tests also a mechanical check every year after 40 years on the road.
Biggest threat to cyclists in central Oxford is pedestrians jaywalking, steeping off the curb without looking. Pedestrians should have to be licensed and insured, and subject to drink/walking tests also a mechanical check every year after 40 years on the road. Sophia
  • Score: 0

11:42am Tue 18 Sep 12

icba1957 says...

Severian wrote:
Cyclist have to share some of the blame, given some of the absolutely stupid things I've seen.

At a junction in Oxford a couple of years ago a cyclist in front of me cycled straight through a red light while texting on his mobile phone!

Many, if not most, cyclists I see seem to think that the Highway Code doesn't apply to them (things like traffic lights, pelican crossings, one way streets and pavements don't seem to have any rules as far as cyclists are concerned).
You can add to that the woman I saw this morning cycling into town on the pavement outside the White House (No 1 bar?) in Botley Road on a bike with a double child carrier on the front!
No way on earth would a pedestrian have been able to avoid her, and nor should they have to!
Unfortunately a large number of cyclists in Oxford would benefit from the application of a taut cheese wire.
[quote][p][bold]Severian[/bold] wrote: Cyclist have to share some of the blame, given some of the absolutely stupid things I've seen. At a junction in Oxford a couple of years ago a cyclist in front of me cycled straight through a red light while texting on his mobile phone! Many, if not most, cyclists I see seem to think that the Highway Code doesn't apply to them (things like traffic lights, pelican crossings, one way streets and pavements don't seem to have any rules as far as cyclists are concerned).[/p][/quote]You can add to that the woman I saw this morning cycling into town on the pavement outside the White House (No 1 bar?) in Botley Road on a bike with a double child carrier on the front! No way on earth would a pedestrian have been able to avoid her, and nor should they have to! Unfortunately a large number of cyclists in Oxford would benefit from the application of a taut cheese wire. icba1957
  • Score: 0

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